Agency Spotlight / Pereira & O'Dell

Agency Spotlight / Pereira & O'Dell

When Corona Light decided to get on Facebook, there would be no half measures. The brand set the goal of becoming the Most Liked light beer in America. In an effort to thank people for helping Corona Light achieve that, it would post its fans’ photos on a billboard in the world’s media center, Times Square. Within two months, Corona Light increased the size of its fan base from 2,000 to 237,000, and people were incredibly engaged and excited. Mark George of Pereira & O'Dell sat down to tell us more about the bold campaign that established Corona Light as the country’s Most Liked light beer.
 
What were the objectives of the Corona Light “Most Liked” campaign?
Corona Light had never officially been on Facebook or had any real digital marketing presence. Unaided awareness of the beer was low, at around 10 percent. We knew that we had to get people talking about Corona Light. We also knew that we couldn’t migrate the existing 2,000 fans to a new brand-managed page and then just expect people to come. We needed to announce our presence on Facebook in a meaningful way, make Corona Light top of mind with a new audience and reward that audience for wanting to be a part of our brand. In other words, we needed to create a movement.
 
So how did you engage that new audience?
We came up with the idea of making Corona Light the Most Liked light beer in America. It was a lofty goal. A key component would be to grow our fan base, but we also wanted to give people a reason to get behind the brand. So we decided that if a fan liked Corona on Facebook, we would put the fan’s photo up in Times Square as a thank you for joining our movement. People were very excited. A security camera across from the billboard took a shot of every fan’s photo when it was on view in Times Square and posted it to that fan’s Facebook wall. This was an important aspect to the campaign because it enabled us to reach out across people’s networks when they shared it with friends and commented on it. One of the coolest things that we observed was the sheer number of people who changed their profile picture to their Times Square photo. That was a wonderful thing to see.
 
Was the campaign integrated with other media?
The big piece was the billboard in Times Square. Our TV spot had a call to action to like us on Facebook. We had a lot of online banners running, all driving traffic to Facebook. We also ran Facebook Ads, targeted by demographic, keyword and region that were wildly successful. A huge piece of the significant fan growth is due to the success of the Facebook Ads, which helped our message spread to friends of our fans.
 
How did you measure the campaign’s success?
When we launched in October, we set the goal of reaching 100,000 Facebook fans by December. Well, in that amount of time we ended up with more than 237,000 fans. From our perspective this was unbelievably successful and exceeded all of our expectations. We also saw increased engagement on the Corona Light page; we had more people posting on our wall, engaging with posts and sharing content with friends. Those metrics were important to us and we saw a significant uptick in all of them. Corona Light went from being a brand with no representation on Facebook to having an incredibly dynamic and active fan base. Mission accomplished.
 
Now that you have all of hundreds of thousands of fans, what are you doing to keep them engaged?
When we first sat down and talked about becoming the Most Liked light beer, we asked ourselves how the Most Liked light beer in America would act and what kind of things the brand would do. We then set out to accomplish these goals. For one, we would give back to charity. We partnered with the V Foundation and created a tab for them on our page. We donated $1 to the foundation for every person who liked us in the month of December. The Most Liked light beer would also give prizes to its fans, so we created “The Big Like Back.” If you liked our page, you were automatically entered into a raffle and could be selected to win a surfboard or other swag. We are using our philanthropy and giveaways to continue to engage our fans. We are rolling out more initiatives to continually reward people for being part of our movement and helping us be the most liked.
 
Did you submit a photo for display in Times Square?
Absolutely! We all want our five minutes of fame. But seriously, one of the first things we always look at when we think about projects is whether or not this is something that we would want to do ourselves. When we came up with the Times Square idea, everyone immediately said that of course they would want to participate. Last Thanksgiving I told my mom that we needed to be in Times Square at 1 p.m. on Black Friday. She had no idea why I wanted to be there so badly. The photo I had uploaded of our family was due to be up on the billboard at 1 p.m. My mom was blown away. I snapped a photo on my camera and we actually used it as our Christmas card that year. I think it’s easy to create marketing campaigns in a vacuum and never really stop and think about whether it’s something you’d want to be part of. This was one of those times when everyone felt like yes, I want to be part of this.
 
Do you have any advice for agencies or clients developing campaigns on Facebook?
First and foremost, what are the target consumers already doing? Can you observe through Facebook what gets people excited about the brand and see if there’s a way to leverage that? Secondly, are there creative ways to use the Facebook platform that haven’t been used before? There are so many tools at your disposal on Facebook; it’s just a question of combining them in the right way to help bring an idea to life.
 
Mark George is a Senior Account Executive at Pereira & O'Dell in San Francisco. Learn more about Corona’s evolution on Facebook in this video.

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A clear view of how people are visiting your business

A clear view of how people are visiting your business

Here are some of our latest product news and updates for agencies and brands.

Check-in numbers on Pages will be updated in the next few weeks
We will be revising the total check-in number on Facebook Pages to provide a more accurate picture of how people are visiting your business. If someone checks into your business multiple times within a 12-hour period, that action will be counted as one unique check-in. Previously, if an individual checked into your business multiple times, each check-in was tallied toward your Page’s total number of check-ins.
 
When people tag their friends at your business location and upload a photo, those photo tags will be counted in aggregate. For example, if someone uploaded 20 photos to an album from a specific location, we'll now count that as a single check-in. But if someone checks in to a location and tags five friends in the photo they upload with the check-in, the total check-ins number will be six—that person’s check-in plus those for their five friends.
 
Reminder: Upgrade to the new Pages design by March 30
All Pages will be upgraded to the new design on Friday March 30. Check out our Pages Product Guide to find out how to best express your brand’s identity with new features like cover photo and Page timeline.
 
Case study: Aveeno sees 7% increase in sales with a key retailer after a Facebook sampling campaign
Watch the case study to learn how Johnson & Johnson used Facebook to help launch the skin care and hair care brand in Australia. The company decided to do a sampling campaign since it realized people would buy the product after having the chance to try it. When consumers ordered the sample on the Aveeno Discoverers Page on Facebook, they received not just the sample but also a coupon to buy it. The company not only exhausted all of its samples in a week—but also saw sales of the product increase 7% at a key retailer after the integrated campaign. To view other case studies, visit our Success Stories site. 

Tags: Facebook Pages,  

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Six steps for building a connected brand

Six steps for building a connected brand

Last week we introduced the Social Business Blueprints and this week we wanted to focus on brand building in the connected world as a follow-up to our Brand Blueprint. The Forrester Consulting study commissioned by Facebook as part of this project showed that 76 percent of the marketers surveyed think social media is important for brand building, and 72 percent think it’s important for customer loyalty. We are often asked how brands get built in the connected world. The real question though, is how do I build a connected brand?
 
People are increasingly relying on their friends to learn about brands, make purchase decisions and engage with brands in social situations. These conversations about brands are happening in social channels all the time.  To make sure your brand is guiding that conversation and taking advantage of the opportunity to deepen relationships with your customers, you must build a connected brand. 
 
The Brand Blueprint outlines six steps marketers can take to become a connected brand. 
  1. Articulate: Define the brand’s social identity so you communicate in a unique, compelling, and authentic voice.
  2. Connect: Find you best and most likely customers and give them a reason to like or follow you in social channels.
  3. Engage: Interact with people by making brand communications and content more personally relevant and participative.
  4. Influence: Inspire and enable people to share stories and messages about your brand.
  5. Integrate: Build social into the brand and product experience to make it more cohesive and useful.
  6. Rejuvenate: Use insights from social channels to continuously monitor your brand’s health and improve the brand experience.
For more on building a connected brand and for a checklist to help you assess how to evolve your brand for the connected world, please read the Brand Blueprint.

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Putting our newest solutions to work for your business

Putting our newest solutions to work for your business

For businesses, Facebook offers Pages to connect with people, ads and sponsored stories to reach people and their friends, and technology to make your business more engaging. Here are some of our latest product news and updates for agencies and brands.

Upgrade to the new Pages design by March 30
All Pages will be upgraded to the new design on March 30. We think of Pages as mission control for your business on Facebook—where you can connect with your fans by announcing new products, sharing news, and gathering feedback. 
 
Check out our Pages Product Guide to find out how to best express your business’ identity with new features like cover photo and Page timeline. You’ll also learn how to reach and engage your audience, as well as how to respond to people in a quick, more personal way with the new messages feature. You can also learn more about the new Pages through our interactive course.
 
New guide details our latest marketing products
Our new guide details the latest types of ads and sponsored stories that emerge from your Page, where you can create unique brand content. The guide details why your brand’s stories are most effective when they start from Page posts. It also includes ad specs and suggested best-use cases. Premium ads and sponsored stories from Page posts put your Page’s voice in the most prominent placement—on the homepage.
 
Three new solutions announced at our fMC event for marketers
Last month in New York, we held our first-ever fMC, Facebook’s premier event for marketers. At the event, we introduced three new solutions, which incorporate our core products across both desktop and mobile. The new Pages are the essential place on Facebook for businesses to build connections with people. You can make sure your fans see your stories using Reach Generator, which guarantees that your stories will reach 75% of your fans each month in a simple, always-on way. 
 
Premium on Facebook helps you maximize the number of people interacting with your brand and talking about you, while unlocking the power of fans and their friends. It is the most impactful way to distribute your content on Facebook. Visit the fMC site for guides to all these products, as well as for video archives of event keynotes and breakout sessions. 
 
Ben & Jerry’s sees 3X ROI using our latest solutions
Ben & Jerry’s was a launch partner for the new Pages, Reach Generator and Premium on Facebook. Watch the video case study to learn how the ice cream brand was able to generate $3 in sales for every dollar spent on Facebook. You can also find more case studies on our Success Stories site.

Tags: Facebook Ads,   Facebook Pages,  

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Building a connected brand and business

Building a connected brand and business

Evolving a business for the connected world can be challenging. Many marketers have told us that they know social is important, but they don’t know how it affects the way they run their business and build brands. A recent Forrester Consulting study commissioned by Facebook showed that 71% of marketing leaders surveyed believe companies can gain a competitive advantage through social media, yet only 33% currently have a long-term strategy for becoming a social business.

With that in mind, Facebook launched a series of white papers or “Social Business Blueprints,” to have these discussions with marketers and share best practices for how marketers and business leaders can tackle some of these big challenges. 
 
The first topics we addressed are the way that brands get built and how organizational design must evolve to execute in the connected world. To provide a foundation for our papers, we commissioned Forrester Consulting to conduct an online survey of 101 VP- and C-level marketing professionals and interviewed 12 CEOs, CMOs, and VPs of marketing. We also compiled many of the stories we’ve experienced first-hand with our clients. 
 
76% of the VP- and C-level marketing professionals surveyed in the Forrester Consulting study agreed that social media is important for brand building and 72% agreed that it is important for customer loyalty. Furthermore, 59% of the VP- and C-level marketing professionals surveyed marketers in the Forrester Consulting study believed that companies that don’t fully embrace social media will not survive in the future. 
 
To help businesses start building their long-term social strategy, the brand blueprint walks through six steps to build a connected brand and the organization blueprint highlights examples for how social can impact every customer-facing part of your organization and the leadership it will require to execute across your organization.
 
This is just the beginning—we hope you join us in an on-going discussion on these topics. We’d love for you to help shape the next topics we explore. What are the issues holding you back from driving deeper social change?

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Introducing Facebook Exchange

Introducing Facebook Exchange

Today we’re announcing that Facebook Exchange (FBX), a new way of purchasing Facebook ads through real-time bidding, is officially out of beta. We first announced that we were testing Facebook Exchange in June of this year. Through Facebook Exchange, advertisers and agencies have been able to use cookie-based targeting through Demand-Side Platforms (DSPs) to reach their audience on Facebook with more timely and relevant messages. For brands and agencies, the result is a powerful tool for driving direct response goals on Facebook. We caught up with Scott Shapiro, product marketing manager for Facebook Exchange, to learn more.

What does Facebook Exchange enable brands and agencies to do?
Facebook Exchange allows marketers to use their own real-time consumer insight data to reach an audience on Facebook. Facebook represents a large portion of display ad inventory on the web—more than 25% according to a recent ComScore study—so this is a significant opportunity for advertisers using DSPs to extend the same strategies that are working for them on other display exchanges to Facebook. The only ad format available on Facebook Exchange is our Facebook Standard Ad, so you can really think of this as display.
 
When should brands and agencies think about using Facebook Exchange?
Start with your objective and the type of targeting that is best to achieve that objective—a deep understanding of those two things will lead you the type of ad product and buying channel that is best for your goals. 
 
For example, say I’m an e-commerce company looking to drive purchases on my site. In this case, people browsing on my website or searching for products that I sell on a search engine are expressing meaningful intent. Facebook Exchange would be a great fit because it enables me to use those signals to remarket to this valuable audience on Facebook, and at the right time. For many advertisers in industries like retail, travel, auto and financial services, Facebook Exchange is a great way to drive conversions from Facebook based off consumer insight data.  Advertisers can extend these same performance-driving techniques they do on other exchanges to Facebook.
 
Any situations where FBX might not be the best fit? 
Absolutely. Suppose my objective is to drive awareness and favorability through a really engaging photo that I post to my brand’s Page. My fans represent my customers. So when they like and comment on my photo I’ll receive viral distribution in news feed. All of that distribution can be increased with Sponsored Stories and Page Post Ads—particularly in the Facebook news feed, one of the most engaging places on the web on both desktop and mobile. In this case, using Facebook’s native targeting options and buying channel is the best choice.
 
Facebook Exchange is perfect when the objective is a conversion outside Facebook and the data used to drive that objective exists outside Facebook. When brand goals like increasing awareness and favorability are the objective, Facebook’s native tools are usually a better fit because they work with all our social formats and placements in addition to fan targeting. 
 
How do advertisers get started with Facebook Exchange?
Advertisers already working with a DSP can give them a call and ask for Facebook Exchange. We have over a dozen of the most prominent U.S.-based DSPs and we are working with newer partners in Europe, Latin America and Asia to have solid presence globally. Your Facebook rep will also be a great resource for helping you align your goals with your larger Facebook strategy.
 
 
Check out this overview guide and contact your preferred DSP or agency trading desk to get started. Facebook Exchange partners include AdRoll, AppNexus, Brandscreen, Criteo, DataXu, MediaMath, Nanigans, Kenshoo, Optimal, RocketFuel, Tellapart, TheTradeDesk, Triggit, Turn, Xaxis, and X+1. For the most up to date list of Facebook Exchange partners, visit the Preferred Marketing Developer directory, click “more options” and select “Facebook Exchange through real-time bidding.”
 
 

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Q&A with Fidji Simo: The Power of News Feed for Brands

Q&A with Fidji Simo: The Power of News Feed for Brands

We sat down with Fidji Simo, Facebook Product Marketing Manager, to learn what brands need to know about the Facebook news feed.

You recently worked on opening up the ability for marketers to advertise in news feed. Can you tell us more?

News feed is truly the center of the Facebook experience. People are spending about 40% of their time on Facebook in the news feed1 and that’s across the more than 950 million people who actively use Facebook every month, 58% of which return daily.2 This is an incredible amount of time but it makes sense: News feed is where people go to share the most important parts of their lives and to receive updates on the things they care most about – whether friends, family, or brands.

On mobile, the news feed is literally the core of the Facebook experience given that it takes up the entire mobile screen. And, the mobile news feed is only further heightened by the growth we’re seeing in mobile – 67% mobile user growth since last year.3

Opening up the ability for marketers to distribute their content in news feed, both on desktop and mobile, is a great opportunity for businesses to seamlessly get in front of their audience in the most engaging way possible.

So how do brands fit in specifically?

The news feed is where people expect to go for up-to-date information from the people, brands, and businesses they care about. We often talk about news feed being like a dynamic newspaper that is personalized just for you. Marketers care about reaching and engaging the right people, so the amount of time spent in news feed directly impacts businesses’ ability to reach and engage their customers. In fact, people are 40-150x more likely to consume branded content via news feed than on a brand Page.4 But time spent is only part of the answer. By appearing in news feed, brands are seamlessly integrated into the stream of highly engaging content that people care most about. This makes brand stories even more noticeable, impactful and personal.

What should brands do to engage people most effectively in news feed?

We think of the brand Page as mission control for a brand on Facebook. Now it’s time to link that with the news feed as the ultimate distribution and engagement vehicle for a brand. A portion of Page posts will show up organically in fans’ news feeds (~16% of fans can be reached by a brand that posts 5 out of 7 days)5 based on the relevance of the post relative to the other stories that could be shown to each fan and the recency of the post. Given how engaged people are in the news feed, relying on organic reach leaves a significant opportunity on the table. With Page post ads, businesses can make sure that their posts get distributed to a much larger audience in news feed. Since people are more likely to be influenced by their friends, marketers can also use Sponsored Stories to make sure people see when their friends engage with a business. For example, stories about people liking a Page post, claiming an Offer, or liking a Page can be shown to more people in news feed.

The best way to generate more engagement in news feed, which will in turn lead to more distribution of a post and more stories about people engaging with a post, is to post quality content. The more engaging a story is, the more distribution in news feed brands can expect to receive for their budget. You’ll notice that the most successful brands post content that is memorable, succinct, and aligned with their brand purpose, encouraging a two-way conversation with the audience, and uses well-produced video or eye-catching photo content.

How can a business get access to news feed and to mobile?

A business has to promote a post or create a sponsored story to get distribution in news feed. Any Page post ad or sponsored story can appear in news feed, both on desktop and mobile, regardless of whether it has been created through any of our self-serve interfaces or via an insertion order. For businesses that want their ads and sponsored stories to appear only in news feed or only on mobile, they can specify this placement in Power Editor, or via our API and Preferred Marketing Developers. For all Pages with more than 400 fans, choosing to “Promote” a post directly from the Page composer or the post itself on the Page will also guarantee that the post is only distributed in news feed.

Any parting thoughts?

I think the news feed makes advertising on Facebook very simple. If brands want to reach people where they are the most engaged, both on desktop and mobile, the news feed is the place to do it. 

For more stats on the power of Facebook for brands, check out this downloadable infographicHave ideas about posts you’d like to see on the Facebook Studio blog? Let us know in the comments, or you can contact us here.

1 comScore Power of Like 2: How Social Marketing Works,  June 2012. 2 Facebook 10Q, June 2012. 3 Ibid. 4 comScore Power of Like 1: How Brands Reach and Influence Fans Through Social Media Marketing, July 2011. Ibid.

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From the jury room / Q&A with Facebook’s Mark D’Arcy

From the jury room / Q&A with Facebook’s Mark D’Arcy

Earlier this month, the Facebook Studio Awards jury convened in New York. By the end of the day jurors narrowed the entries to 11 winners from 10 agencies representing seven countries. Mark D’Arcy, member of the jury and Facebook’s Director of Global Creative Solutions, shares his behind-the-scenes perspective and his thoughts on what sets great work apart.
 
First, why give a Facebook Studio Award?
We see so much great work submitted to Facebook Studio from all over the world. With the awards, the goal is to celebrate the people behind some of the best work that is leading the industry forward, and like all good award programs, enable us to learn from each other.
 
How did the jury evaluate the work? 
We looked for things that are social by design—work that is built around people and the way they connect with each other. Is this an idea that someone is going to care about? Is this an idea someone is going to want to share with the people they’re closest to? Then we looked at how the different parts of the Facebook platform were used to bring the idea to life. We also looked at how the Facebook components of the campaign integrated with other media like TV and in-person experiences—how the creativity on Facebook bridged into the rest for the world.
 
How was the jury selected?
We wanted to make sure that we had different facets of the industry represented from a creative perspective.  We included people with developer, traditional brand advertising and direct marketing backgrounds. We wanted that cross-fertilization of ideas and belief structures to come together into an authentic debate about what the best work on Facebook looks like.
 
Did the jury see any themes emerge from the shortlist? What stood out?
One of the things we really valued was when the passion and energy from a campaign manifested itself in real-world activation. We also looked at the application of technology through lightweight design. Many of the campaigns awarded are based on a simple social insight and designed in a scalable way. We also wanted the winning work to demonstrate the value in having focus. The winning entries showcase that simplicity is often most effective.
 
Hearing the different opinions from the jury, you really get to one of the central issues with the industry: Facebook is a new platform, and a lot of the traditional skills of advertising creativity have a great place here, but with a new architecture. Great things happen when people who come from a more technical background respect the traditional aspects of storytelling, and when the storytellers respect the technical expertise of lightweight design and simplicity. The most successful work brings those two sides of the industry together around an idea and brings it to life on the Facebook platform. You could see that in both in the work and the way the jury responded to it.
 
What was one of the more intense discussions from the jury?
There was an interesting discussion around the blue award, the highest-level award, and what it means to represent the best marketing on Facebook. We decided that the work for Amex’s Small Business Saturday sets the bar for a few reasons. 
 
Facebook is used as the true connection between people and businesses. It is the type of work that would not have been possible without Facebook. 
 
Award programs by their nature aren’t designed to recognize ongoing programs that change businesses. With the blue for Small Business Saturday we also wanted to recognize the power of this type of thinking—and the truly hard work that happens in growing a program after launch. With Small Business Saturday, multiple agencies and the client worked together to create a platform that has been transformational for Amex’s business and has lived far beyond a typical campaign. The work also genuinely made the world better.
 
What excites you most about being a creative today?
It’s an incredibly exciting time for our industry. Most of us weren’t working in the early ’50s when television became the dominant transformational platform of advertising.  We have to watch Mad Men or read books to experience that era. But we’re living here now in the midst of the platform shift of our age. The people who are investing their energy and talents to really understand the social dynamics of how campaigns can be built on Facebook, to be transformational for brands, those creatives are the ones with the curiosity and the passion to build extraordinary things. Not just traditional creative thinkers, but creative thinkers who work in every facet of the industry. Facebook brings those people together, because to do anything great involves the collaboration of many different parts of the ecosystem. 
 
Mark D’Arcy is Director of Global Creative Solutions at Facebook.
 

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It’s time to socialize the creative brief

It’s time to socialize the creative brief

I love the simplicity of a great creative brief: a sharply defined objective, a key consumer insight and a strategic idea that services them both. Creative briefs force marketers to commit to a single idea, and really good ones significantly increase the chances that the work developed will actually drive the business/brand objectives.  But after writing them (my agency days) reacting to them (my client days) and now thinking about them from a social perspective (my Facebook days), I’m convinced it’s time to add a little more nuance to the brief. Today there is room for two key insights, an engagement insight and a social insight. When you start off with both of these as the core to your strategy, you’ll be equipped to unlock huge potential in the increasingly connected world your consumers live in.

What is an engagement insight?
Engagement insights are the insights that marketers already spend a lot of time developing for their marketing strategies.  It’s the “Why do I care?” component – the connection between the brand and the person receiving the message.  It’s that nugget we look for that exposes a unique way to approach the idea, and this insight is usually based on the relationship the consumer has with the category or the brand.

What’s a social insight?
If the engagement insight is centered on the connection between a person and a brand, the social insight is centered on the relationships between consumers of that brand and their friends/family. Here the question is “Why would I share?” Social insights are the motivations that live underneath people’s desire to share an experience, a perspective, a memory or a passion.  It is these exchanges that shape our relationships. They are also a big part of how the world sees us. And it is from these two areas – belonging and identity – where we’ve seen some of the best social insights come.

Camaraderie, friendship and love are all part of belonging. It’s that feeling of being part of something bigger than just yourself.  It’s the opposite of alone. It’s about connection, and it’s a foundational piece of Facebook’s value proposition. The social insight is a reflection of why a person is connected to the friends that they are connected to. With brand experiences that are built upon these relationship insights, the desire to share is natural.  But not all “belonging” needs to look and feel the same.  That’s where the insight work comes into play.  What are the unique belonging insights for your target?  How do young guys foster the feelings of belonging vs. say new moms, teenage girls in the U.K., Latinos living in the U.S.?  The brands that can unlock these insights will be best positioned to get to a powerful social insight.

Of course, a big reason why we want to share things with the people we know is to express ourselves. We grow as individuals through expression. Research shows that the number one reason people enjoy Facebook is because they want to curate their identity and showcase their personality to people: they want to be heard. This is what drives people to share their experiences through status updates, check-ins, likes – and some of the best brand experiences.  So what are the shared desires of your consumer target when it comes to identity?  In other words, what do your consumers want to express about themselves that your brand can help facilitate?  Is it about where they are in life?  Is it about something they aspire to be?  Is it a passion, skill set or perspective?  Is it about showing their creativity, intelligence, fashion savvy or humor?  Or is it something else?

Social by design, from the start
Before you even start thinking about the specific idea, think about why people would share it and what makes them want to do so. Does it strengthen relationships, or communicate something meaningful about yourself? Think about how somebody can become a catalyst for change throughout his or her network.  If you think about that early on, there's a much better chance sharing will be at the core of the campaign in an essential and exciting way. Begin by asking these questions and the idea and the mechanics will take shape from there.

Many of these insights are probably already bubbling throughout your brand teams’ thinking.  In these cases, it’s simply recognizing and using them to inspire everything from the overarching idea all the way to the specific design and execution. 

This is not about changing the way you get to a powerful brand idea.  It’s about extending that idea through the network of people who would care about it.  Marketers spend massive amounts of money bringing an idea to life and exposing it to their target with the hopes of influencing them.  But if you could build it in a more social way that gets people to share it – why wouldn’t you?  The idea strengthens through these human exchanges (word of mouth) and your incremental investment can return exponential value.  

And the simplest way to start doing this is by making that little change to the creative brief, in other words, asking why they would care, and why they would share. 

Tom Brown is Head of Global Customer Marketing for North America at Facebook, where his team’s mission is to build transformative social ideas for top brand marketers.

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New tool helps you create sample Premium campaigns

New tool helps you create sample Premium campaigns

We recently launched the first version of the Facebook demo tool, an app designed to help brands and agencies mock up how their premium ads will look to people when they’re using Facebook. The demo tool makes it easier than ever to visualize how creative from your Page will translate into different Premium on Facebook placements. Anyone can use the demo tool to test different campaign ideas and share them with colleagues or clients.
 
Getting started
The first step is to create a sample brand Page by uploading a profile photo and cover photo. Be sure to check out these best practices for the new Pages layout. 
 
Next, choose a few of your friends to be “fans” of the brand. These sample fans will help illustrate what people see when their friends are connected to your brand. (Please note that you are building mockups in a simulated environment—your activity in the application, including friend selection, won’t publish to Facebook.)
 
You can create Page post content from photos, status updates or questions. Once your Page post is ready, you can preview it as an ad or a sponsored story. You can also preview your Page posts in three different locations: right-hand-side, news feed on your desktop and news feed on mobile.
 
Have fun
The demo tool lets you experience the visual impact of Premium on Facebook first-hand, rather than just imagining how your ads and sponsored stories would appear to fans and friends of fans. Please keep in mind that currently, the demo tool provides a visual overview of Premium on Facebook, but does not comprehensively describe all Premium ad scenarios.
 
We’d love to hear your feedback on version one—please click on “Feedback” to let us know what you think, how you’re using the demo tool, and what features you’d like to see in the next release.
 
 

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